GUY DEBORD PSYCHOGEOGRAPHY PDF

The psychogeographic slopes were symbolized by red arrows indicating the forces the city exerted on drifters freed from other motivations for moving: drifters would be pulled in the direction of the arrows from one unity of ambiance to another. The weight, shape, and patterning of the arrows indicated the lengths and strengths of the psychogeographic slopes. Pick up the map, go out in the city, and walk the circle, keeping as close as you can to the curve. Record the experience as you go, in whatever medium you favour. A friend recently told me that he had just wandered through the Harz region of Germany while blindly following the directions of a map of London. We are so tuned out, focused on getting through places for practical reasons get to school, to work, etc.

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At a conference in Cosio di Arroscia, Italy in , the Lettrists joined the International Movement for an Imaginist Bauhaus to set a proper definition for the idea announced by Gil J.

Wolman : "Unitary Urbanism - the synthesis of art and technology that we call for — must be constructed according to certain new values of life, values which now need to be distinguished and disseminated. The implication of combining these two negations is that by creating abstraction, one creates art, which, in turn, creates a point of distinction that unitary urbanism insists must be nullified.

Their intentions remained completely as abstractions. The new space creates a possibility for activity not formerly determined by one besides the individual. Debord readily admits in his film A Critique of Separation, "The sectors of a city…are decipherable, but the personal meaning they have for us is incommunicable, as is the secrecy of private life in general, regarding which we possess nothing but pitiful documents".

Despite the ambiguity of the theory, Debord committed himself firmly to its practical basis in reality, even as he later confesses, "none of this is very clear. It is a completely typical drunken monologue…with its vain phrases that do not await response and its overbearing explanations. And its silences.

Among the rants which construct the film regarding art, ignorance, consumerism, militarism is a desperate call for psychogeographic action: When freedom is practised in a closed circle, it fades into a dream, becomes a mere image of itself. The ambiance of play is by nature unstable. At any moment, "ordinary life" may prevail once again. The geographical limitation of play is even more striking than its temporal limitation. Every game takes place within the boundaries of its own spatial domain.

Their very landscape is animated. Obstacles were everywhere. And they were all interrelated, maintaining a unified reign of poverty. The researches undertaken by WNLA, AAA and the London Psychogeographical Association during the s support the contention of Asger Jorn and the Scandinavian Situationniste Drakagygett - that the psychogeographical is a concept only known through practise of its techniques. Without undertaking the programme expounded by Chtchglov, and the resultant submission to the urban unknown, comprehension of the Formulary is not possible.

We are living under a permanent curfew. Not just the cops — the geometry". Contemporary psychogeography[ edit ] Since the s, as situationist theory became popular in artistic and academic circles, avant-garde , neoist , and revolutionary groups emerged, developing psychogeographical praxis in various ways.

Influenced primarily through the re-emergence of the London Psychogeographical Association and the foundation of The Workshop for Non-Linear Architecture , these groups have assisted in the development of a contemporary psychogeography. The journal Transgressions: A Journal of Urban Exploration which appears to have ceased publication sometime in collated and developed a number of post-avant-garde revolutionary psychogeographical themes. The journal also contributed to the use and development of psychogeographical maps [13] which have, since , been used in political actions, drifts and projections, distributed as flyers.

Since in the United States , separate events known as Provflux and Psy-Geo-conflux have been dedicated to action-based participatory experiments, under the academic umbrella of psychogeography. Psychogeography also become a device used in performance art and literature. In Britain in particular, psychogeography has become a recognised descriptive term used in discussion of successful writers such as Iain Sinclair and Peter Ackroyd and the documentaries of filmmaker Patrick Keiller.

The popularity of Sinclair drew the term into greater public use in the United Kingdom. Though Sinclair makes infrequent use of the jargon associated with the Situationists, he has certainly popularized the term by producing a large body of work based on pedestrian exploration of the urban and suburban landscape.

Sinclair and similar thinkers draw on a longstanding British literary tradition of the exploration of urban landscapes, predating the Situationists, found in the work of writers like William Blake , Arthur Machen , and Thomas de Quincey. The nature and history of London were a central focus of these writers, utilising romantic , gothic , and occult ideas to describe and transform the city. Sinclair drew on this tradition combined with his own explorations as a way of criticising modern developments of urban space in such key texts as Lights Out for the Territory.

Merlin Coverley gives equal prominence to this literary tradition alongside Situationism in his book Psychogeography, not only recognising that the situationist origins of psychogeography are sometimes forgotten, but that via certain writers like Edgar Allan Poe , Daniel Defoe , and Charles Baudelaire, they had a shared tradition. Novelist Will Self had a column "Psychogeography" which started out in the British Airways Inflight magazine and then appeared weekly in the Saturday magazine of The Independent newspaper until October The concepts and themes seen in popular comics writers such as Alan Moore in works like From Hell are also now seen as significant works of psychogeography.

Other key figures in this version of the idea are Walter Benjamin , J. Ballard , and Nicholas Hawksmoor. Part of this development saw increasing use of ideas and terminology by some psychogeographers from Fortean and occult areas like earth mysteries , ley lines , and chaos magic , a course pioneered by Sinclair.

A core element in virtually all these developments remains a dissatisfaction with the nature and design of the modern environment and a desire to make the everyday world more interesting. After a few years of practicing, the psychogeography group that gravitates around the Urban Squares Initiative and Aleksandar Janicijevic, [14] [15] the initiator of, and main figure in organizing and leading this group, came up with the working definition of this procedure as: "The subjective analysis—mental reaction, to neighbourhood behaviours related to geographic location.

A chronological process based on the order of appearance of observed topics, with the time delayed inclusion of other relevant instances". In Aleksandar Janicijevic published "Urbis - Language of the urban fabric" as a visual attempt to rediscover lost or neglected urban symbols. In another book was published "MyPsychogeography", an attempt to synthesize sketches and ideas which have informed his art practice. Known groups, some of whom are still operating, include:.

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An introduction to Psychogeography

Introduction to a Critique of Urban Geography, 2. At a conference in Coscio de Arroscia, Italy in , the Lettrists joined the International Movement for an Imaginist Bauhaus to set a proper definition for the idea announced by Gil J. The implication of combining these two negations is that by creating abstraction, one creates art, which, in turn, creates a point of distinction that unitary urbanism insists must be nullified. Their intentions remained completely as abstractions. The new space creates a possibility for activity not formerly determined by one besides the individual. However, the Situationist International may have been tongue-in-cheek about some parts of Psychogeography.

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Psychogeography by Guy Debord

Marshalls Plc Tuesday 27th February, This post marks the first of a series of articles tackling the subject of psychogeography. But, before we are able justify psychogeography as a topic worthy of a series, we need to provide a definition of what psychogeography actually is. In fact, its history has origins centuries before the term was even first coined. For psychogeography as a movement is essentially the tale of two cities: London and Paris. Paris exists as the home and birthplace of the term while London has long been inhabited by what are predominantly psychogeographic ideas.

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Guy Debord

Garage publishing program in collaboration with Ad Marginem Press. Minima Series Eight essays by the famous author of The Society of the Spectacle explore the urban space as a platform for resistance and a promise of a new way of life. An experimental drift, usually undertaken by small groups of people, is guided by chance and the energy of the space and allows the forming of a sensory map of the city. Only such outings, Debord argues, can turn life into an exciting game and a continuous critique of forced entertainment, subverting the existing modes of collective leisure and living taught to us through advertising, spectacle, and consumption. The more absurd and ridiculous the events one encounters on a drift, the more they are likely to transform social ethics and aesthetics, because a new beauty can only be a beauty of situations, and never a beauty of readymade forms. One day, we will build cities for drift.

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Psychogeography

At a conference in Cosio di Arroscia, Italy in , the Lettrists joined the International Movement for an Imaginist Bauhaus to set a proper definition for the idea announced by Gil J. Wolman : "Unitary Urbanism - the synthesis of art and technology that we call for — must be constructed according to certain new values of life, values which now need to be distinguished and disseminated. The implication of combining these two negations is that by creating abstraction, one creates art, which, in turn, creates a point of distinction that unitary urbanism insists must be nullified. Their intentions remained completely as abstractions. The new space creates a possibility for activity not formerly determined by one besides the individual. Debord readily admits in his film A Critique of Separation, "The sectors of a city…are decipherable, but the personal meaning they have for us is incommunicable, as is the secrecy of private life in general, regarding which we possess nothing but pitiful documents". Despite the ambiguity of the theory, Debord committed himself firmly to its practical basis in reality, even as he later confesses, "none of this is very clear.

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