HERUKA SADHANA PDF

Aradal The force of absorbed concentration, The force of discriminating awareness, The factor of absorbed concentration for attaining a purified state And the factor of joyful perseverance for attaining a purified state — These four are, in turn: The mantras and the light then transform into a square fence made of crossed double-vajras, Black in the east, green in the north, Red in the west, yellow in the south, Pervading asdhana up to the realm of Brahma and down to the golden base. Thank you for coming today Tengku! Before the fires on the mountains are siddhas who have attained actualizations, Holders of pure awareness, and yogis and yoginis acting in accord with the close-bonding practices. From a syllable HUM on herika sun-disc at my heart, Light-rays emanate, inviting back before me All the directional protectors, local area protectors, and so on, Dwelling in the eight charnel grounds, And the entire Chakrasamvara saxhana, to the space before me. Kyabje Pabongka Rinpoche 30 H.

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As a Mahayana practice, it is undertaken with a bodhichitta aim to purify all our karma in order to reach enlightenment as quickly as possible in order to be best able to help all limited beings sentient beings. On an ultimate level, Vajrasattva practice is non-conceptual meditation on voidness emptiness. On a provisional level, it entails repeated recitation of a hundred-syllable mantra yig-rgya , accompanied by opponent states of mind and complex visualizations.

Vajrasattva mantra recitation and visualization may be undertaken merely within the context of sutra practice, before beginning any practice of tantra. Such sadhana practice may be within the context of any class of tantra. Regardless of which level on which we practice Vajrasattva meditation, it is aimed at purifying ourselves of karma. There are several slightly different explanations of it given by various Indian Buddhist masters. There is no need to go into the details of the differences here.

Only Mahayana asserts the possibility of purification of karma before it finishes ripening. According to the Hinayana schools, all our karmic aftermaths must ripen, even if only into the experience of a very minor result, before we pass away in the lifetime in which we become liberated as an arhat or enlightened as a Buddha.

Purification of karma can only occur within the framework of the four noble truths: true sufferings, true causes true origins , true stoppings true cessations , and true pathways of mind true paths.

True Sufferings True sufferings refer to experiencing the results that ripen from karma. These may be tainted feelings of some level of happiness or unhappiness or they may be tainted aggregate factors of experience phung-po, Skt.

There are three varieties of true sufferings: The experience of unhappiness. This ripens from destructive behavior committed because of unawareness of behavioral cause and effect and with unawareness of reality.

In general, a destructive action is one that is motivated by a disturbing emotion of attachment, hostility, or naivety, as well as no sense of values and having no scruples. The experience of a tainted fleeting happiness that cannot satisfy, since it cannot prevent unhappiness from returning, and when it ends, there is no certainty of what follows. This ripens from constructive behavior committed with unawareness of reality. In general, a constructive action is one that is motivated by detachment, lack of hostility, or lack of naivety, as well as having a sense of values and having scruples.

These aggregate factors of experience constitute the basis for and context within which we experience the first two types of true sufferings. These aggregate factors also ripen from the former two types of behavior, destructive and constructive, and from unspecified behavior also committed with unawareness of reality.

More specifically, this third type of true suffering refers to: The experience of the aggregate factors of a rebirth itself — the life form, physical and mental features, and instincts with which we are born. The experience of the place and situation into which we are born. The experience of things happening to us, similar to our past karmic actions. True Causes The true causes of these three types of suffering are karma and disturbing emotions and attitudes nyon-mongs, Skt.

They motivate karmic actions as well as serve as the conditions for bringing about the ripening of the karmic aftermaths from those actions. According to the law of certainty of karma, when we experience unhappiness, it is certain that this unhappiness has ripened from the karmic aftermaths of destructive actions.

When we experience tainted happiness, it is certain that this tainted happiness has ripened from the karmic aftermaths of constructive actions. Both constructive and destructive karmic actions, however, are motivated and carried out with unawareness of reality. Three conditions bring about the ripening of karmic aftermaths into the third type of true suffering — the experience of tainted aggregates — which forms the basis for experiencing the first two types of true sufferings — the experiences of unhappiness and of tainted happiness.

The first two conditions are types of disturbing emotions or attitudes, while the third is a karmic urge. All three conditions arise within the context of experiencing some level of tainted happiness, unhappiness, or a neutral feeling. Those three types of tainted feelings, in turn, are what have already ripened from other karmic aftermaths.

The three conditions are: Craving sred-pa An obtainer len-pa A karmic urge for further existence srid-pa. As a disturbing emotion, craving exaggerates the positive or negative qualities of the feeling on which it focuses, while the grasping for truly established existence that accompanies the craving projects truly established existence onto that feeling and its qualities. Similar to craving, this obtainer longing desire or attachment exaggerates the good qualities of the desirable sensory object on which it focuses, while the grasping for truly established existence that accompanies the obtainer emotion projects truly established existence onto that sensory object.

Alternatively, an obtainer may be one of several disturbing attitudes. Thus, both craving and an obtainer disturbing emotion or attitude arise because of unawareness of reality — more specifically, because of grasping for truly established existence — and are accompanied by that unawareness and grasping.

The craving and obtainer then cause a karmic urge for further existence to arise. This karmic urge activates the karmic aftermaths of the types of karmic actions that have the power to bring about a further rebirth.

The activated karmic aftermaths consist of both the karmic urge that will hurl our mental continuum into the experience of its next rebirth and the karmic urges that will bring about its experience of the conditions of that rebirth.

In short: Out of unawareness of reality, we commit karmic actions. This leaves karmic aftermaths on our mental continuum. Some karmic aftermaths ripen into our experience of the feeling of some level of tainted happiness, unhappiness, or a neutral feeling. We experience those tainted feelings within the context of the tainted aggregates that have ripened from other karmic aftermaths.

Unawareness of reality brings about craving directed toward some tainted feeling that we are experiencing and brings about as well an obtainer emotion or attitude directed at either the object toward which we are experiencing that tainted feeling or the aggregate factors within which the experience of that object is occurring. This craving and obtainer serve as the conditions for the arising of a karmic urge for further existence. That karmic urge activates yet other karmic aftermath; and then this activated karmic aftermaths, now in the form of a throwing karma, brings about our experience of future tainted aggregates.

Yet other karmic aftermaths then ripen into the tainted feelings that we experience within the context of those future tainted aggregates, and we experience those feelings with yet further unawareness of reality. Ultimately, then, the true cause of sufferings is unawareness of reality, or more specifically, grasping for truly established existence.

The twelve links of dependent arising outline the mechanism in full. Thus, true stoppings refer to an absolute absence of karma and disturbing emotions and attitudes as true causes, and an absolute absence of what ripens from them: tainted feelings and tainted aggregates as true sufferings.

True Path of Mind A true path of mind that brings about a true stopping is a non-conceptual cognition of voidness emptiness , based on safe direction refuge , with either simply renunciation or also a bodhichitta aim. This focus is accompanied by the intentions to attain that enlightenment and to benefit all limited beings by means of that attainment.

In the context of dzogchen practice, this blissful non-conceptual cognition of voidness is with pure awareness rig-pa, rigpa. For the sake of simplicity of discussion, let us limit our presentation to clear light awareness, since most relevant points about it pertain to pure awareness as well.

Vajrasattva represents fully realized clear light awareness in its two aspects: Its third noble truth aspect of double purity dag-pa gnyis-ldan — it has 1 the natural purity of its nature having never been stained by karma or by the disturbing emotions and attitudes and 2 the purity achieved through having removed those fleeting stains such that they never recur.

Its fourth noble truth aspect as that which rids us of true sufferings and their true causes. Vajrasattva meditation is practiced with the focus on purifying karma. When, with clear light awareness Vajrasattva, we achieve final purification of all karma, we attain enlightenment. What Is Purified: Karmic Aftermaths Since purifying karma means purifying the karmic aftermaths of our karmic actions, let us look at the three types of karmic aftermath that need to be purified.

Here, I have coined the term karmic aftermath to refer to all three: Networks tshogs, collections of karmic force Karmic tendencies sa-bon, seeds, traces Karmic constant habits bag-chags. Only the Mahayana tenet systems assert karmic constant habits; the Hinayana tenet systems do not assert them. Karmic forces, but not karmic tendencies, ripen into experiencing the tainted aggregates in general of a samsaric rebirth. Both karmic forces and karmic tendencies, however, ripen during a rebirth into: Experiencing the tainted feelings of happiness or unhappiness Experiencing feelings to repeat karmic actions similar to those we have committed previously Experiencing things happening to us similar to the karmic actions we have committed Experiencing types of environment in which all of these occur.

Karmic forces and karmic tendencies are also similar in the sense that both ripen intermittently, not continuously. Once they have finished giving rise to their results, they are exhausted; they can no longer be activated. Further, karmic forces are either constructive or destructive phenomena, whereas karmic tendencies are unspecified phenomena, ethically neutral. Karmic constant habits, on the other hand, give rise to their effects continuously. They give rise to limited awareness in each moment of our experience and the inability to cognize the two truths simultaneously — what exists and how each thing exists.

Like karmic tendencies, they are unspecified phenomena. Karmic constant habits never exhaust; they never end naturally. They only end when our non-conceptual cognition of voidness rids us of our cognitive obscurations shes-sgrib as well, with the attainment of enlightenment. We cannot purify or eliminate the results that have already arisen from them, such as having been born blind. To understand how purification is possible, we need to understand the type of phenomena that karmic aftermaths are.

Although there are more complex presentations of the types of phenomena that some of them are, let us look at the least complicated explanation. According to this explanation, the three types of karmic aftermath are all nonstatic abstractions and all are imputations on a mental continuum.

They do not share five congruent features in common with the primary consciousness of the moment of cognition in which they occur. Moreover, because they are further affected by conditions, they change from moment to moment. As the karmic aftermaths produce effects, they affect our experience. We can achieve a true stopping true cessation of them. The presence, however, of karmic aftermaths is only a valid imputation on a mental continuum that contains the experience of their causal karmic actions and that has the possibility of containing future moments of experiencing the karmic results that can arise from them.

The three karmic aftermaths exist imputably on a mental continuum only so long as they are still able to produce an effect. The production of an effect can only happen dependently on causes and conditions. When we eliminate the causes and conditions that are capable of causing the karmic aftermaths to produce their effects, their production of an effect is no longer possible. When their production of an effect is no longer possible, the existence of the karmic aftermaths that could have produced an effect is no longer a valid imputation on a mental continuum.

This is the way we purify karmic aftermaths. Through non-conceptual cognition of voidness, we eliminate grasping for truly established existence, and thus eliminate the craving and obtainer disturbing emotions or attitudes that could act as the conditions for the karmic aftermaths to be activated and to give rise to their effects.

The Purification Process First, we rid spang-ba our mental continuums of their networks of karmic force and their karmic tendencies. We rid ourselves of our networks of both positive and negative karmic force and all our karmic tendencies with the attainment of arhatship, in other words the attainment of liberation.

During the rest of the lifetime in which we have attained liberation, we still experience the tainted aggregates with which we were born. In addition, we still experience things happening to us similar to our past karmic actions. However, we no longer experience tainted feelings of happiness or unhappiness, and we no longer experience feeling like repeating our past karmic behavior.

Upon rebirth in a pure land after that lifetime, we no longer experience tainted aggregates either, or things happening to us similar to our past karmic actions.

However, we still have limited awareness. We rid ourselves of karmic constant habits only with the attainment of enlightenment. With such an attainment, we become omniscient Buddhas. Provisional Vajrasattva Practice Arrow down Arrow up Although ultimate Vajrasattva purification practice is non-conceptual meditation on voidness done within the context of anuttarayoga tantra practice, especially with clear light awareness, provisional Vajrasattva practice is done with mantra recitation and visualization and, at best, a conceptual understanding of voidness.

However, they still are valid imputation on the mental continuum and, now transformed into karmic constant habits, hinder the attainment of enlightenment.

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HERUKA SADHANA PDF

As a Mahayana practice, it is undertaken with a bodhichitta aim to purify all our karma in order to reach enlightenment as quickly as possible in order to be best able to help all limited beings sentient beings. On an ultimate level, Vajrasattva practice is non-conceptual meditation on voidness emptiness. On a provisional level, it entails repeated recitation of a hundred-syllable mantra yig-rgya , accompanied by opponent states of mind and complex visualizations. Vajrasattva mantra recitation and visualization may be undertaken merely within the context of sutra practice, before beginning any practice of tantra. Such sadhana practice may be within the context of any class of tantra. Regardless of which level on which we practice Vajrasattva meditation, it is aimed at purifying ourselves of karma. There are several slightly different explanations of it given by various Indian Buddhist masters.

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The Practices of Heruka & Vajrayogini

ChakZhipa is the wrathful protector emanation of Chakrasamvara, and is practiced by Karma Kagyu practitioners, usually those who have done some sort of retreat, esp. It is related to an epithet of the Hindu god, Lord Shiva, who is addressed as Shambo, usually translated, Auspicious One. The word heruka comes from Sanskrit and it signifies a semi-wrathful guardian. Used independently of any other name, it usually refers to Chakrasamvara. The name Chakrasamvara means Supreme Bliss of the Wheel. The great Heruka is often depicted with four faces, twelve arms, and in union or complete embrace with his consort , Vajravarahi. He is blue-black.

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Empowerment Before engaging in either of these practices it is necessary to receive an empowerment and instructions from a qualified Spiritual Guide. These empowerments are given every other year at International Kadampa Festivals , and occasionally at other events. This can only be seen by Buddhas. This realization directly removes subtle dualistic appearances from our mind, and due to this we quickly become definitive Heruka. To lead fortunate disciples to the state of Buddha Heruka within one life, Buddha Vajradhara manifested his compassion in the form of interpretative Heruka, who has a blue-coloured body, four faces, and twelve arms, and embraces his consort, Vajravarahi.

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